Magazine review: 1) PIN–UP #10, Spring Summer 2011.

Architecture magazines have a certain stigma. They don’t look like they were designed using Macs. Technical renderings haphazardly positioned alongside text in three languages. Badly-designed ads for shingles, cladding and hardware. Basically, they were made strictly for architects.

PIN—UP, issue 10 Spring Summer 2011

PIN–UP, however, is a unique case. It was created by Felix Burrichter (Instagram: febubufe), a trained architect. But at some point, he ended up working with the editors of Fantastic Man magazine. Eventually, he set up his own magazine. In the autumn of 2006, the first issue of PIN–UP was born.

Table of contents

PIN–UP took the ugly factor of architecture magazines and drenched it in Arial Black and neon Pantone colours. The contributors list is dotted with industry superstars, plus others from non-architecture backgrounds.

Editor's Letter

Editor’s Letter

The magazine starts with several advertisements of furniture and fashion brands. The Editor’s Letter explains the theme behind the issue, in this case, how architecture attracts through more than just looks and space.

Page 20-21

Page 20-21

The next section further explains the seduction of architecture through various examples, from churches to geodesic domes.

Nightstands by Aranda \ Lasch, Leon Ransmeier

One of the major attractions of this issue is The PIN–UP Nightstands, where the magazine commissioned eleven creatives to design their ideal nightstand. My favourite nightstand is Leon Ransmeier’s drinking water-dispensing model because I keep water close to my bed. Ransmeier is a graduate of Rhode Island School of Design.

Arandla \ Lasch, Thevery Many

Fashion creeps in through the section ‘TEN QUESTIONS TEN NEW YORK ARCHITECTS’. Interviews are in question-and-answer format, laid out together with the architects themselves modelling sponsored fashion, namely Patrik Ervell, Jil Sander, Acne, Adam Kimmel and other brands you’d find at Opening Ceremony.

Right page, essay on Victor Bisharat. Left page, print by Bethan Laura Wood.

Right page, essay on Victor Bisharat. Left page, print by Bethan Laura Wood.

The paper stock changes from glossy to matte, indicating its more ‘serious’ content. This section explores the life of Lina Bo Bardi, an architect who gave Brazil a number of Modernist buildings, among others.

Apartment of John Currin and Rachel Feinstein. Photography by KT Auleta.

Apartment of John Currin and Rachel Feinstein. Photography by KT Auleta.

One of the things that gives PIN–UP its almost-avant garde streak is printing content related to human sexuality and extravagantly-decorative interiors. Perhaps it’s in line with the Seduction theme, but I’ve noticed it appears throughout other issues regularly. Some articles are casually-written and sometimes have a slight campy voice. And especially for this issue, each article ends with the author noting their favourite smell (Burrichter’s is fresh-cut grass).

Simon Fujiwara, interviewed by Stuart Comer and photographed by Carla Verea.

Simon Fujiwara, interviewed by Stuart Comer and photographed by Carla Verea.

Based on the PIN–UP issues I own, I have summed up the magazine’s formula with this recipe:
1 starchitect (Santiago Calatrava)
1 openly homosexual artist (Simon Fujiwara)
1 PIN–UP-curated feature (The PIN–UP Nightstands)
1 photo essay by a famous photographer (KT Auleta)
… and a sprinkling of snappy articles on architecture projects in western Europe and the Americas.

In case you’re wondering, the PIN–UP masthead uses an en dash.

Title: PIN–UP
ISSN: 1933-9755
Issue: 10, Spring Summer 2011
Pages: 190
Editor-in-Chief: Felix Burrichter
Cover art: Derek Galon, Margret Gajek
Origin: New York
Cover price: USD 15

Further reading: Interview with Felix Burrichter by Alexandre Stipanovich, Opening Ceremony

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